Sunday, November 21, 2004


View form the Art Department Helicopter Posted by Hello
The location of our accomodation for the Art Expedition 2005:

Castiglionchio


Sunday, November 14, 2004

Research workbook studies

A reminder of what you should be focussing on in your RWBs at the moment

Kim

Group Identities, Boundaries and Borders in Art

How and why do groups of people (nationalities, religions, armies, tribes, gangs, football clubs, companies etc) display their group identities through art and visual imagery? How might groups of people be identified by ‘outsiders’? (think of how you chose to represent countries by food – what other symbols or clich├ęs might work in the same way)

Some Ideas:

Look at propaganda paintings (American ‘Uncle Sam’, British ‘Your Country Needs You’, German, Russian, Italian & Japanese posters from the 2nd world war for example) Soviet Socialist Realism etc

Masks, Uniforms and Costumes from various tribes, groups and societies (from the Masaai and the Spanish navy to the Iroquois and the Ku Klux Klan)

Badges, Logos and Icons – from paintings of crucifixions in an Italian Church to the ‘Lupetto’ of AS. Roma

Modern Graffiti on trains, walls etc.

History paintings – battles, conquests and maps. Look at Albrecht Altdorfer, Paolo Uccello , Simone Martini, Ambrogio Lorenzetti. The Bayeux Tapestry etc.


Caroline

When does Art become garment and garment become Art? How does fashion influence Art and vice versa?

Ritual and performance. For example: masks of the Fang people of West Africa, Japanese Noh theatre masks, North American traditional headdresses, Australian Aboriginal body painting. The costumes and contraptions of modern artist Rebecca Horn. (etc etc etc)

Where does the basic function (covering, protection, warmth etc) become less importance than the aesthetic appearance?

Fashion as a visual statement of politics and ideologies: Flapper girls in the 20s, Punks in the 70s, Hippies in the 60s etc

Influences in both directions – Pop Art, Op Art, Conceptual Art.

How does fashion in post War Britain (for example) reflect social and artistic change?

Maeli

‘Talking about Art is like dancing about Architecture’ (Frank Zappa)

Can one art form explain another?

How have visual artists tried to depict performance and music in their work?

Japanese prints of theatrical performance (Hiroshige, Hokusai etc)

European painting and sculpture: Degas, Caravaggio, Fiorentino, Watteau, Italian futurist paintings (and music), Breughel, Lautrec, Max Beckmann, Picasso’s Circus performers etc.

Masks and costumes that express the role of the wearer – from various African nations and tribes, theatrical masks from China, Japan, Greece etc.

How has music been influenced by visual artists and vice versa?

Many visual artistic movements/styles had a musical equivalent (Baroque, Impressionist, Modernist, Dadaist)

Schoenberg (painter and composer), Matisse (La Danse, La Musique etc), Mondrian (Broadway Boogie Woogie)



Steff

Symbiosis: Humans and Nature in Art.

Investigating art that suggests the strength of the relationship between humankind and the environment around it.

Possible artists:

Pre 20th Century European: Metamorphosis – plants and animals into humans - Bosch, Bernini, Arcimboldo etc

Modern European: Andy Goldsworthy (abstract forms from natural materials), Anthony Gormley, Sophie Ryder (animal human creatures), Land Art – Robert Smithson. Picasso’s Centaurs etc.

Non European: Ritualistic animal masks, fetishes and totems from a variety of cultures: North and South American, African etc. Hindu animal human hybrid gods etc.

What do these metamorphic or hybrid beings suggest about human origins, relationships with nature and each other?

Romantic Art – the idea of humans at the mercy of the immense power of nature Caspar David Freidrich, JWM Turner, Albert Bierstadt etc

Wednesday, November 10, 2004


Y12 IB Artist Dilara Medin is awarded 1st prize in the 2004 FAO World Food Day poster competition. Posted by Hello

Wednesday, October 20, 2004

The Turner Prize 2004:

Shock Horror?

Have a look - see who you would pick.
For Year 12 Artists:

National Portrait Gallery London

Search the Collection for artists or even the people they painted....

Monday, October 18, 2004

Here are some links for Year 10 students for their holiday work:

African Masks

Japanese, Korean & Chinese Art

Native American Art & Culture

The best way to find pictures is to do a Google Image Search:

IMAGE SEARCH

Friday, October 15, 2004


Kim gets ready for haloween  Posted by Hello

 Posted by Hello
Maeli painting quite big Posted by Hello

Thursday, October 14, 2004

Check out this excellent Art WEBLOG. Lots of links to new artists and exhibitions

steff eats clay Posted by Hello

Blue Dress Posted by Hello

Recent Works Posted by Hello

Kims 3rd Baby Posted by Hello

Recent Images from aY13 class.... Posted by Hello

OK, I have finally worked out a way of getting pictures onto this weblog for free! Posted by Hello

Adjmal and Phoebe Posted by Hello

Sunday, August 29, 2004

IB ART RESULTS 2004

PHOEBE 'NOT PORKY' STANNARD 7

AMY 'THE LAWYER' GRIFFIN 7

SOPHIE 'COULD WORK HARDER' MUNRO-FAURE 7

SOPHIA 'KOYLEEE KAPTUNKE' MARINHO DE LEMOS 7

JENNY 'MORAG MC DOUGALL' CHALMERS 6

ADJMAL 'LADY MAGNET' DULLOO 5



HIP HIP HOORAY !!!!!

START WORKING HARD NOW YEAR 13 2004-2005


Thursday, June 10, 2004

Inspiration for new IB students:

At home with Mr Dow
Summer work for Y11 students beginning IB Art in September 2004:

Your summer holiday task forms the beginning of your I.B. Art practical work and research studies coursework upon which your entire final grade is based. It should therefore be completed to a very high standard of presentation and content.

The first part of the task is to produce written and illustrated research in your Research Workbook. The Research Workbook records your personal investigations, practical experimentation, historical and contextual studies and developing studio work in the form of essays, illustrations, notes, photographs etc. It accounts for 30 % of your final grade. From September onwards you will be expected to complete around 4 sides in this book each week.

 First get yourself a Research Workbook ! They Must be A4 size (30cm x 20cm approx.) hard bound (usually in black ) with 140 pages (280 sides). They normally cost around €15. I know it seems a bit mean expecting you to buy your own, but if I bought everyone a book then we’d have less money for paint, paper, clay etc. etc…. Also I feel students are less likely to leave their book on the bus, or drop it in the river if is their own.

The Research tasks:

Part One : During the summer you are to visit at least one gallery or exhibition (it doesn’t have to be in Rome). Write and illustrate a review of your visit. It is often better to write about work that you have seen which you like - but it isn’t essential. Whether your critical writing is positive or negative, it must be thoughtful - not just “I don’t like this, it’s boring” or “ I like this because it’s realistic”. You’ve all done critical writing in your G.C.S.E. Art course - remember?!!! Over 6 sides of your RWB consider issues such as:

 Scale - how does a work of art’s size affect the viewer (and how is seeing an actual work of art different from seeing a reproduction in a book or on the internet for example?)
 Materials - what is it created from ?- why? - what effect does the material give?
 Content - what does the work represent ? Narrative - does it tell a story ? Does the time and place in which the piece was made affect the style and intended meaning of the work? give your personal interpretation.
 The Artist - Who ? When ?
 Even basic descriptions of colour, shapes etc. are useful - how is the mood or atmosphere of a piece affected by the artists use of colour, texture, line, pattern etc. ?
 Value judgement - is the piece successful ? Why ?

 Part Two : Research for IB Coursework Project

Your first school-based project will begin with the creation of a sculpture taking the form mask or head-dress that will be the final outcome of your research into a wide range of existing examples and other relevant inspiration and references. Therefore you will fill at least 6 sides with drawings, paintings, photographs and notes which will form the basis of your research. For example:
Native American headgear, gas masks, gimp masks, Japanese theatrical masks, motorcycle helmets, Venetian carnival masks, traditional tribal masks from various African nations, cricket masks, hockey masks, armour, skulls of animals, fish and birds, diving masks and helmets, welding masks, Egyptian burial masks, etc etc etc….

Part Three: Design and create a poster for World Food Day. (This is a coursework project)
The theme of the poster is ‘Biodiversity for Food Security’. This must be written clearly on your poster (in any language) Your poster can be between 30 x 40 cm and 50 x 70 cm (see me for paper). Aim to illustrate the idea of self help rather than hand outs to the poor. Have a look at www.fao.org/wfd/ and also www.feedingminds.org for more ideas. Do a couple of pages of research and studies in your book before making the final poster. Be bold – which posters do you remember most clearly? which were most effective in communicating their message to you?

Remember lots of nice drawings, clear legible notes, a few photographs - this is the start of your Research Workbook - make it look attractive and interesting. Total 14 sides minimum, split between the three tasks.

http://saintgeorgesart.blogspot.com/ is the Art Department Weblog. I add useful ideas, information and links to this fairly regularly so check it out)

NO PART OF THIS WORK IS ‘OPTIONAL’ !!! HAVE A GREAT SUMMER
Year 12 holiday tasks:

Obviously you must begin by completing any unfinished work from Year Twelve (refer to list given to you in May 2004)

The Research Workbook tasks:

Part One : (5 sides) During the summer you are to visit at least one gallery or exhibition (it doesn’t have to be in Rome). Write and illustrate a review of your visit. It is often better to write about work that you have seen which you like - but it isn’t essential. Whether your critical writing is positive or negative, it must be thoughtful - not just “I don’t like this, it’s boring” or “ I like this because it’s realistic”. You’ve all done critical writing in your G.C.S.E. Art course - remember?!!! Consider issues such as:

 Scale - how does a work of art’s size affect the viewer (and how is seeing an actual work of art different from seeing a reproduction in a book or on the internet?)
 Materials - what is it created from ?- why? - what effect do these materials give?
 Content - what does the work represent ? What is its meaning and who is its intended audience? Narrative - does it tell a story ? give your personal interpretation.
 The Artist - Who ? When ?
 Even basic descriptions of colour, composition, shapes etc. are useful - how is the mood or atmosphere of a piece affected by the artists use of colour, texture, line, pattern and their spatial arrangement etc. ?
 Value judgement - is the piece successful? Why?
 How does the work reflect the time and place in which it was created (contemporary society/culture)?

Part Two : (5 sides) Record a visit to a specific building, built environment or monument. Examples: Piazza Navona, The Pantheon or Trajan’s Column etc. etc. They don’t have to be “old”, but it’s probably best to avoid writing about “the porchetta stall near my house” !

In your written and illustrated report, record your observations whilst considering issues such as:

 Scale - how does the building, monument or built environment relate on a “human scale” - does it “dwarf” people - why? (to impress, to accommodate a specific use, to inspire fear, devotion etc.)
 Inspiration/style - can you see any connections with art or design movements (Art Nouveau, Neo Classical, Art Deco, Modernism? Etc.)
 Decoration - is it decorated ? Why? - Why would you decorate a building? In what style ? Describe - organic (plant forms etc.), geometrical simplicity etc .
 Function – What is it for? How well does the space, monument or building fulfil its intended role?
 How does it relate to the location in which it is placed (natural environment, other buildings etc.?)

Part Three : Preparing for Year 13 Coursework Projects

At least 12 sides relating to images, artefacts, techniques, experimentation observations and artists’ work connected with your chosen theme for you first personally directed project. Good preparation is essential for a successful project. Take loads of photographs, make loads of drawings – even stuff which is too large to fit in your book. Go nuts – develop an obsession!

Remember lots of nice drawings, clear legible notes, a few photographs - this should be the start of your second Research Workbook - make it look attractive and interesting. Total 22 sides or more, split between both tasks.

You must have completed at least 240 sides in your Research Workbooks by the start of Year Thirteen.
This is the normal amount for an ‘average’ (around level 5) student at Higher Level.

AND FINALLY:

At least one major piece of NEW studio work relating to your chosen theme. This could be a large drawing, painting, sculpture etc. It could be a project in its own right or a high quality ‘study’ leading up to an even more ambitious piece of work. It should be at least equivalent to your oil painting self portrait in terms of quality and time spent on it.

Work to the best of your ability. You will be amazed how fast those 2 remaining terms of IB Art will go. Don’t forget – there’s no final exam in this course. It’s just you and your Research Workbook and the studio work that get the final grade…

Saturday, June 05, 2004

2004 Art Exhibition @ St. George's

Monday 7th June

5.00pm - 7.00pm

The very best GCSE, A level and IB Art in Rome is open for viewing

Wine

Peanuts

A String Quartet

Bring the whole family!

Friday, May 07, 2004

Now that you Y13s have a little time without Art in your lives, perhaps you should visit the website of the living legend that is Dennis

Sunday, February 29, 2004

Miro, A Just Man
Miro was goodness, a just man in all things. He did not speak much but was very couteous. I never saw him with a camera or a ballpoint pen, but he would sometimes spend an hour contemplating the landscape. He and I were alone. I prudently kept my distance. He liked places that were difficult to get to, with a good view.

[Francesco Sole, Miro´s chauffeur during 25 years. Interview at ABC, in Spain, 1983.]

How good was Barcelona?

The sun

The Art

Casa Batllo

The Miro Foundation

The lamp posts

Caroline Conte's punctuality



Here's a cool site:

Art Daily

It is the best online Art Newspaper - lots and lots of resources

Date for your diaries:

Thursday 29th March

The world's best ever IB Art exhibition opens at St George's


How good was Barcelona

The sun

The Art

Casa Batllo

The Miro Foundation

The lamp posts

Caroline Conte's punctuality

Here's a cool site:

Art Daily

It is the best online Art Newspaper - lots and lots of resources

Date for your diaries:

Thursday 29th March

The world's best ever IB Art exhibition opens at St George's


Right then....

I am in Dubai talking about you lot and what bizarre stuff you make.

So that means:

Year 12 get on with your Workbooks. A bit of printing is OK, but wait until I get back if you are in any doubt!

Year 13 - I haven't updated the clock of doom so it is 3 hours slow.

Make sure you are ready for Barcelona

If you are worried about me here is a link to the Dubai weather:

Scorchio

Wednesday, February 18, 2004

Year 12 should have completed 12 sides of research specifically on Miro, Gaudi & Picasso by the end of the half term break. ( as part of their minimum 80 sides to be allowed on the trip). Year 13s should have completed at least 6 sides of research on the artists prior to the trip.

Here is the Picasso Museum in Barcelona

Monday, February 09, 2004

Joan Miro Foundation

We shall be going here whilst in Barcelona, start you research now:

MIRO
Quote of the day:

'Do you remember when I had a moustache? ' (Phoebe Y13)

Friday, February 06, 2004

Quote of the day:

'When I was little I LOVED electric drills!!!' (Kim Sung Y12)

Monday, February 02, 2004

Lots of info on newish and very hip (mostly British) artists

WHITE CUBE
Late news flash....

Grayson Perry DID win the Turner prize - beating bookies favourites those naughty Chapman brothers:

Not for small people....
OK, it has been a while, so I'd better start putting relevant information up here....

ANTON GAUDI

Year 12 & 13 artists start researching now! You'll be seeing a lot of his work in Barcelona